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Big Data & Open Data Keys to Smart Cities, Part 2

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Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
8/15/2014 10:44:26 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Smart cities definition
Scott, I enjoyed this blog but as the devil advocate would say.....where does this take Cyber Crime,? Check out the article below http://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/After-Russian-hackers-breach-12-billion-records-Where-is-cybercrime-going-next-.html

Scott Ferguson
Scott Ferguson  
8/11/2014 10:04:05 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Smart cities definition
@GBurnett: Thanks very much for sharing, and thanks for the kind words on the blog post. And you are right about the definition, it's very fluid, but like anything else, good marketing and positioning these cities as desirable places to live, will make other join in. 

GBurnett
GBurnett  
8/9/2014 1:36:46 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Smart cities definition
I think the language alone, "Smart Cities", is a great development in that it potentially conveys a level of awareness and intention and commitment for improvement that can easily be construed as positive.  While the definition may indeed prove to be somewhat fluid at this point in time, it still holds that this kind of nomenclature can boost interest and thereby participation in the increase of both data accumulation and its disbursement to agencies and industries that can make it useful.

This information flow can be useful to gain efficiencies and increase the quality of life in our urban centers on many fronts.  Here's a good, thoughtful example in a recent article on Forbes' web site:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyolson/2014/07/07/why-google-waze-helps-local-governments-track-its-users/

Nice article, thank you for writing this.

kq4ym
kq4ym  
8/7/2014 3:49:07 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Barcelona example and Data Exchange
I can see how cellular operators would be very reluctant to part with their data, unless they can work out a nice fee schedule for use. As in Barcelona, that's going to be a continuing problem to solve in order to coordinate data and IoT ideas into workable solutions.

Scott Ferguson
Scott Ferguson  
8/5/2014 12:35:17 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Barcelona example and Data Exchange
@Pablo: A great example and thanks for sharing. So, we have Boston from my piece, Barcelona as another example, and who's got more to share?

 

Scott Ferguson
Scott Ferguson  
8/5/2014 12:34:07 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Additional Info
@Kim: You're right and I think that's why I liked the approach the IHS took to how it defined what a so-called "smart city" is, specifically one that is taking a data-driven, IoT approach and doing across multiple projects that offer the most benefit. Let me offer a direct quote from the IHS analyst to help:

What this means in practice is that a smart city project must be shown to cover multiple areas across these different application segments, and not be focused specifically on just one or two elements within the same category For example, is a city that has multiple projects aimed at energy and sustainability really 'smart', or is it just advanced in that specific category? Under the IHS definition, a city would need to be running projects across multiple different categories. 

Pablo Valerio
Pablo Valerio  
8/5/2014 8:47:58 AM
User Rank Blogger
Barcelona example and Data Exchange
Scott, I had a couple of meetings with the Barcelona CIO and talked to several city officials during the Smart City and Mobile World Congresses. One of the most important topics has been always Open Data.

Cities are opening thier databases to service providers and research institutions to create new services and optimize resources. But they also need to tap into data collected by others, especially telecoms.

One of the biggest complains from the Barcelona CIO is the reluctance of celullar operators to share agregated data, which they consider a saleable asset. At the same time the same operators want exclusive access to some data held by the government.

That is why Barcelona has decided to share the same data with everyone:

http://opendata.bcn.cat/opendata/en/

For example Google Maps knows when the next bus is coming to the stop near my house, and the weather service gets information from the pollution monitoring stations. Companies can check the status of the electricity being used in one city block and how many people are using the free WiFi around town.

Antoni Vives, deputy mayor for Urban Habitat, launched an urgent call to operators during the last Mobile World Congress:

"Carriers should understand that the signs of times have changed," and they must collaborate with cities opening access to their data to develop new business opportunities, instead of trying to monetize everything. "The milk you are trying to squeeze is going to cause a lot of pain to the cities."

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
8/4/2014 5:37:58 PM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Additional Info
Right on, Kim. As it is, any city with RFID or NFC and a few sensors in place is automatically intelligent. While I'm sure the local chamber of commerce loves that sort of thing, the lack of substance is more likely to backfire on those who brag the loudest.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
8/4/2014 2:49:14 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Additional Info
I think the definition issue is important, because there's a risk that what qualifies a city as "smart" becomes so broad that the world is full of "smart cities."  I mean, which cities in the developed world don't have some kind of online interaction between governments and citizens, and at least some basic IoT fabric.

Unless we keep the benchmark reasonably high, the term will become useless.

Scott Ferguson
Scott Ferguson  
8/3/2014 5:03:04 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Additional Info
I get into some more specifics here including how IHS views a smart city, which is different from how others define it. The analyst said she believes they have a pretty good definition, but concedes it could change over time.

Part of the blog is here: http://www.ubmfuturecities.com/author.asp?section_id=459&doc_id=526799&

 

 

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