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Jane's Walk: How City Waterways Can Become Public Spaces

Jordan Fraade, Writer & Editor
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 13:00 EDT

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NewDream
NewDream  
9/29/2014 10:57:08 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Riverwalk
I agree 100%. Cities should encourage anything and everything that gets people out of their private cars and into shared resources. Parks, waterways, walking malls, etc. are all great steps in the right direction.

kq4ym
kq4ym  
9/29/2014 10:50:47 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Riverwalk
We all seem to naturally gravitate towards water; rivers, canals, the ocean. What better way to use it than for public spaces. Giving up some private ownership for public use could become a priority goal for most cities, as nearly everywhere has waterways of some sort. Planners, owners, and government agencies should be applauded for moving towards the use of this great resource for public good. 

NewDream
NewDream  
5/21/2014 5:59:26 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Water Taxi
@Resurgent phoenix, the water taxis are boats, and as such they do just fine in the rain. In a hurricane, they could suffer lots of damage, I suppose. It's a good question, and I'll see if I can find out the answer.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/21/2014 5:57:10 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: On the waterfront
When they built those 26 inch walls they probably thought it was a good ideal to build something that could withstand the storms and last for ever. It is really too bad it can not be utilized today.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/21/2014 5:55:22 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: On the waterfront
Jordan, mixed use development stores, factories, walkways, residential and leisure activities are great developments for water fronts. A friend told me when she came to our city in the twenties and the water front was full of polluting factories because the water was necessary for production.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/21/2014 5:44:26 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Water Taxi
New dream, what happen to the water taxi structure when it rains or a hurricane hits. Are they built in a way to survive or do they have to be rebuilt.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/21/2014 5:41:56 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: New York's old problems
Toby, you mean my grandfathers old watch could contain radium. Thanks for informing me.

CitySolver
CitySolver  
5/18/2014 6:57:30 AM
User Rank Blogger
soft development
It is very important to utilise such a waterfront assett but as you mention in your article, this has to be coordinated to allow or reduce flooding. Its all well and good building large stores but what about surface water run off and flooding. Is there a way to promote developing on the first floor up so that floods do minimal damage and have ground floors as low risk enterprises?? Just ideas?

jordanfraade
jordanfraade  
5/13/2014 1:33:27 PM
User Rank Blogger
Re: On the waterfront
I think you make a good point...it seems that in post-industrial Red Hook, there may be two kinds of buildings: warehouses, and buildings that were actually used as docking stations for the ships themselves. The Fairway Market in Red Hook is an example of a reused warehouse, and as far as I can tell, there are no real design problems. In fact, because the Fairway only takes up one floor, the tour guide told us they've placed apartments on top of the supermarket.

But with a building like the Navy Terminal, I can see why there might be big design problems. Hard to use it for anything other than its intended purpose. Unfortunately, it's not clear whether the city has any intention of bringing heavy industry/shipping back to the neighborhood. Part of me likes the idea of keeping it there as a testament to the city's past — seems like a more interesting/valuable use for the space than a Home Depot or what have you.

NewDream
NewDream  
5/13/2014 7:52:06 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Riverwalk
I used to regularly go to Riverwalk here in Fort Lauderdale for the monthly Sunday Jazz Brunch. I think it is still going, although I understand the numbers have been down in recent years.

Waterfronts are a natural place for outdoor events where a variety of people can mingle and get to know one another. I hope to see more of this in cities all over the world.

One of the most famous Riverwalks is in San Antonio; I remember pedaling a boat there when I was a youngster visiting with my mom, a couple of uncles, and my grandmother. It was one of the best city experiences we had on a great tour, starting from Ormond Beach, Florida, driving across the Gulf Coast, Texas, and New Mexico, finally finishing our trip in northern Arizona.

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