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Urban China's No. 1 Need Is Water

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stotheco
stotheco  
7/9/2013 8:41:06 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Where to start...
I would like to hear from @Akasha as well. I've seen on the news how people have had to wear masks because of how the smog has gotten. I have also seen pictures of bodies of water that look murky and almost black surrounding the country. Like Mary said, it is great news to hear, but I would also want to know more.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
7/8/2013 1:03:52 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Water
New York State's rivers and streams are gorgeous. I spent years camping upstate and fishing and boating there. The watershed is protected and the reservoirs in the Catskills are lovely. It's a plan that has worked so far because those involved have made it a priority.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
7/8/2013 12:44:38 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Where to start...
@Akasha, while it's great to hear that the situation may not be so dire in China, I'm wondering what gave you that impression, especially as you've had to wear face masks at times to cope with the pollution. That alone seems like an extreme measure, signaling a pretty bad situation.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
7/8/2013 12:36:32 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Water for China only?
Your point about bottled water is a good one, RamonAntonio. It is staggering to think that on one hand, we are globally destroying both our environment and peace in pursuit of oil, while on the other hand, we are clamoring for water. There's a terrible contradiction there. Likewise, bottling water is another example of how we shoot ourselves in the collective foot. I have no answers.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
7/4/2013 7:26:19 PM
User Rank Burgher
Water
Adam,

Thank you very much for this post!  I found it very interesting.  I have always known the importance of water to mankind.  When I visit areas I inquire about the water and how it is supplied and protected.

 I found the section of your blog that said " one of the world's most costly capital projects is the $68 billion North to South Water Diversion Project, which will link China's four main rivers via more than 1,800 miles of pipeline, and divert water from the south of China to population centers in the north."   I hope they can do this without major harm to the environment.  The New York method of investing in and protecting the Catskill is good.  I discovered that the City of live in had many streams running thru the City and pipes were put into the ground to control the flow of those streams.  Very few neighborhoods have stream in this city now.  Sometimes I think to myself it would be nice to dig up those pipes and let the water flow and be cleaned by nature.  Of course that would take more than just digging up the pipes.

 

I traveled thru New York by train and the sight of the streams in that state is beautiful.  People were swimming, fishing and having fun in the streams as I looked out the window on the train. 

 

I hate to think in fifty years we will be fighting over water. 

 

Thanks Adam for a blog that inspired me to find out more about water around the world.

Akasha
Akasha  
7/4/2013 9:45:35 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Where to start...
Susan what I was referring is an overall view including mega as well as small cities. Yes you are right that these megacities are having intense ollution and I have seen as well as used face mask to avoid it at few places. But on large canvas the situation is not that bad as it seems.

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
7/4/2013 9:10:16 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Where to start...
That's interesting, Akasha, that the pollution didn't strike you as an issue when you were there. I've heard from friends who say it's overwhelming in the megacities. And as you say, the move to motor transport is probably only adding to the issue.

I did see that the government took a big step toward curbing the problem in June, with the goal of reducing pollution from heavy industry by 30 percent in the next five years. That will be impressive if they manage it. Hope so.

Akasha
Akasha  
7/4/2013 8:59:08 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Where to start...
Susan on my recent visit to china I am not sure about pollution getting much out of hand. I have seen quite few cities and things seems in order. The change which I actually felt was the change in transportation used by the people. Now the number of vehicles on the road has increased many a time then what it was about 10-15 years back and that was the biggest source of pollution for me.

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
7/4/2013 7:11:06 AM
User Rank Blogger
Where to start...
Thanks for a thoughtful post, Adam. The figure that jumped out at me was the amount of pollution -- that more than 20 percent of the water supply is polluted beyond usability. How does that compare to the States, for example. It seems incredibly high.

There so much in the news about pollution in China -- particularly air pollution. Is there any real evidence that the government is addressing the problem? My impression is that their attitude is full steam ahead whatever the consequences. 

 

RamonAntonio
RamonAntonio  
7/3/2013 7:05:37 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Water for China only?
The biggest reserve of fresh water in the world are defrosting right in front of us, the poles. So the matematics are clear, the future ahead is one of absolutely LESS fresh water reserves. We MUST start by recognizing that.

The second issue is the present practices of use of water not only for consumption but for industrial uses. More water is used in idustrial aplications and agriculture for cleaning than the amount consumed by people or plants.

The third isse is that of the plastic bottles of water. They should simply be outlawed worldwide. The inefficiency of that industry alone can supply water to thaousands if not millions and extracts money from the economy that should simply be used for investment or savings. A reusable bottle and tap water is sufficient. A dollar less is needed for economic growth.

So it is not a matter of design or infrastructure. Its a problem of basic mathematics as I said. Water use should be the first and foremost International Worlwide Regulation. Wars, famines and crime are based on wwater crisis. The USA in fact, moved (and else) American Indians mostly for water not for agricultural land.

THis is an exciting issue Adam. Thanks for bringing iot up. But from my point of view, the first and foremost attack must be political not technological. If humanity cannot agree on the overall reality that in 50 years the NExt World War will be for water an prevent it, there is no technology that can save us.

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