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City Sensors Send Traffic Apps in New Directions

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jack90
jack90  
3/8/2014 3:01:47 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Zero Sum Traffic Jams?
Traffic and health analysts acquiesce that persons are at upper stakes of breast assails in traffic. Do yourself a countenance also outsmart it. This Appguide desire facilitate anyone grow a traffic guide moreover secure to their purpose safely furthermore happily.

writing an annotated bibliography

Pablo Valerio
Pablo Valerio  
11/20/2013 7:56:28 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Zero Sum Traffic Jams?
@kg4ym, you are talking about the next step in traffic apps. Using complex analytics it would be possible to know how many people are taking the same route, and send different alternative routes to different drivers to aliviate drivers.

I'm lookig at some solutions now during the Smart Cities Conference, and I'll update this information soon.

Pablo Valerio
Pablo Valerio  
11/20/2013 7:50:36 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Multi-tasking behind the wheel
Terry, I agree 100%. We need to keep our eyes on the road, that's why some car manufacturers disconnect the navigation screens while the car is moving. Some cars display basic information on the dashboard, such as the distance to the next turn and direction, but not a complete map.

Using a smartphone is always a bad idea. Car navigation systems are now able to run different applications, and onboard GPS is more accurate that the one on the phones.

Pablo Valerio
Pablo Valerio  
11/20/2013 7:47:10 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Google's data
Nicole, most traffic data is shared by cities --from street sensors, cameras and wifi--  and allow companies such as Google and other traffic info providers to tap into it. Some providers, such as cell companies, have additional information derived from geolocation of cell phones.

Some people have optimized their apps to take advantage of the information and optimize navigation taking those factors into consideration.

The features that are coming now are more important for cities, as traffic authorities are able to interface with the apps (through an open standard) and suggest different routes. I'm seeing some applications during the Smart Cities Conference this week.

Toby
Toby  
11/20/2013 5:24:13 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Diversion
I believe the Garmin units do some of this currently. I can think of several occasions where the traffic delays caused the unit to automatically change course. It would be totally cool if whoever you were going to meet could be automatically made aware of your new route and change of arrival time also.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
11/19/2013 8:41:12 PM
User Rank Burgher
This can save lifes
This would be an excellent app to utilize in a disaster or emergency situation.  Uniform personnel could use this to determine the best route to take.  For Example if an Earthquake hits and parts of bridges collaspe they could then take the quickest alternate route to rescue or transport people to areas for treatment.  Perhaps dangerous areas can be broadcast thru technology to let people know what routes to avoid also.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
11/19/2013 7:57:20 PM
User Rank Blogger
Multi-tasking behind the wheel
Wait a minute... if I'm driving, should I really be launching or interacting with traffic apps, even if I've got some voice-response feature activated ("Siri, tell Google Maps that Wlishire Blvd.'s a constipated hellhole!")? Eyes on the road, not on the smartphone, right?

kq4ym
kq4ym  
11/19/2013 5:29:57 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Zero Sum Traffic Jams?
If and when traffic apps universally take into account best routes and delays, at some point it may not even matter asdrivers detour to the new route at the same time as thousands of others do likewise on directions from Tom Tom or Garmin. They'll only work if a minority of drivers take advantage of the "faster" route while those other folks stay mired in traffic.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
11/19/2013 5:14:25 PM
User Rank Staff
Google's data
Great stuff, Pablo. I'm very interested in this topic and I'm glad you covered it.

One thing puzzles me -- I use Google Maps often to find out how long a taxi ride is going to be, and it often tells me which routes have "heavy traffic" or "light traffic." Where is that data coming from? Does Google have access to real-time information? And is this unique to NYC? It sounds, from your blog post, like this will be a new feature for drivers in Barcelona and perhaps other cities... so I'm wondering if it differs from what I'm talking about.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
11/19/2013 12:37:39 PM
User Rank Staff
The 'sense' of things to come
Thanks for this overview, Pablo, which hints at the potential for regulating traffic from the city's servers -- smart traffic control, if you will.

I truly see the future in apps like ClearPath, though I predict the big success will come from future, cloud-based commercial offerings.

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