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New York Builds for Flood Resilience

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CitySolver
CitySolver  
6/27/2014 2:20:44 PM
User Rank Blogger
Compact services
I had not thought about that. Yes I think that now alot of our secondary services are lighter and more compact than you once were and so can go above ground without causing noise pollution and wasting valuable floor space. I think that in flood zones moving away from using basements as anything other than car parks is asking for trouble though. We need to get serious about flooding and accept it as a part of 21st century life and adapt accordingly.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
6/24/2014 3:14:06 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: How many times do we repeat this cycle?
It's INSANITY, Susan. Why are our attention spans so dang short as a species? Why do people willfully ignore the dangers of purchasing in such an area? Anyone with access to a news source can see that weather "events" are getting crazier, bigger, less predictable... if they ever were predictable. 

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
6/24/2014 7:28:05 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: How many times do we repeat this cycle?
Amy, this sentence from that great flood insurance article you posted makes me mad!

The new law caps flood insurance premium increases and allows below-market insurance rates to be passed on to people buying homes in flood zones with taxpayer-subsidized policies.

People who are already living there understandably should get some relief. But why should that be "passed on to people buying"? It feels like one step forward two steps back. Inevitably, somebody is going to get hit financially, but the alternative is to perpetuate the cycle, as Terry points out.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
6/23/2014 2:33:23 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Raising cities
I was fascinated by the idea that we're now elevating expensive and dangerous equipment and materials, rather than burying it all in the basement, as in the past.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
6/23/2014 2:31:32 PM
User Rank Staff
Insurance
I was glad I asked about existing structures, which won't be affected by the new code.  This is where Ciancia saw the insurance companies stepping in, increasing premiums where there's no attempt to comply with best practices.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
6/23/2014 2:29:54 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: How many times do we repeat this cycle?
I think one can't underestimate the commitment of communities to neighborhoods which have only, very gradually become relatively unsafe.  Emptying half of Staten Island, or closing the NJ boardwalks for good, may be efficient, but would hardly be popular. On the other hand, I do wonder about the wisdom of rebuilding along the Rockaways.

How many millions of people live along the San Andreas fault?

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
6/23/2014 11:11:26 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: How many times do we repeat this cycle?
I'm with Terry. It's one thing to live in a 50- or 100-year-old building now threatened by rising waters. It's a whole 'nother thing to deliberatly build something new in such a zone. 

I have relatives living in a flood-prone part of Connecticut. On their short street, something like 5 houses have been for sale for AGES - and I know that proximity to the river and the attendant high price for flood insurance has something to do with those houses not moving into new buyers' hands.

This was an interesting read about a federal response to the issue of spiking flood-insurance premiums. 

 

kq4ym
kq4ym  
6/23/2014 9:11:03 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: How many times do we repeat this cycle?
One wonders how the insurance industry may affect codes and building practices in flood prone areas. On one hand they certainly take advantage of disasters to raise rates dramatically after an event. But, whether high insurance premiums mitigate builders and investors desires to build is another question. And one would guess the insurance industry is highly involved in pressing for more stringent codes  to prevent their future losses.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
6/23/2014 8:51:22 AM
User Rank Blogger
How many times do we repeat this cycle?
Why aren't property insurers being pulled into this equation more? Can't they refuse to insure properties in flood plains, or at the very least, make the cost of insuring homes and businesses so expensive that developers think twice before building on them?

I'm thinking in particular about places in along the US's Gulf Coast, or even North Carolina's Outer Banks, where hurricanes and floods regularly devastate buildings, roads and other infrastructure. And yet we continue to re-build. For how much longer?

CitySolver
CitySolver  
6/21/2014 11:49:12 AM
User Rank Blogger
Raising cities
I think that putting benign activities like parking is a great idea. elevating expensive premises above ground level is a logical step. A new arcade culture may psring up in the US. Cities could have mutilevel streets with pedestrians set one level above cars and let the floods flow underneath. Not cheap, but maybe the only real solution to passive defense.

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