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Cities & Poverty: Connecting the Dots

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Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/28/2014 10:38:30 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Poverty
It seems like the poor will always be with us. Yet, Urban farming does improve the lifestyle of the poor in many instances. I have friends from many areas and they did not know they were poor until someone or some media told them. Like the rich man taking a child to a poor farm and asking him what he thought of the poor. The child said things like they have a stream or river to swim in and we have a cemented body of water in the backyard.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/28/2014 10:38:03 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Poverty
It seems like the poor will always be with us. Yet, Urban farming does improve the lifestyle of the poor in many instances. I have friends from many areas and they did not know they were poor until someone or some media told them. Like the rich man taking a child to a poor farm and asking him what he thought of the poor. The child said things like they have a stream or river to swim in and we have a cemented body of water in the backyard.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/28/2014 10:37:58 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Poverty
It seems like the poor will always be with us. Yet, Urban farming does improve the lifestyle of the poor in many instances. I have friends from many areas and they did not know they were poor until someone or some media told them. Like the rich man taking a child to a poor farm and asking him what he thought of the poor. The child said things like they have a stream or river to swim in and we have a cemented body of water in the backyard.

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/28/2014 10:29:59 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Libraries and public facilities
I know many people without home computers who have email addresses,Facebook, twitter accounts,etc... Many of them utilize public computers at Schools, Libraries , Museums, etc... In addition, the cell phone provide web access.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
5/22/2014 3:31:52 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Poverty
Not a bad idea, that one. We pay Comcash $19 a month, in this pitiful unadvertised rate they don't even talk about publicly, then $35 for Web to that local ISP I mentioned. Our two Verizon smartphones are the big ticket item each month, but I write off a portion of mine as a freelance writer. 

Davedgreat2000
Davedgreat2000  
5/22/2014 3:22:30 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Poverty
@Amy, its kind of already here. But with Cable TV instead of Internet. However, for higher speed Internet you will pay $50 or more per month. Right now for 30 Mbps download and about 10 Mbps Upload speeds I pay $50/month. I could get 60Mbps for nearly $100/month. At that price i'm totally out of the internet or no more cable TV for my family.

My wife suggested that we just cut Cable and Internet all together and pay for a hotspot on our phones so we can stream directly to our TV applications such as Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon Prime. We already pay $85/month for phone and if we were to include Hotspot that would go up to $95. but we cut out cable all together.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
5/22/2014 3:12:37 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Poverty
Hi Kim: To your point about Web access to the home, just yesterday, my mom-and-pop ISP, which I happily shill out to over big impersonal cable companies, offered to double my speed if I paid them $50 a month instead of the current $35. I might do it, still mulling - but between that and the debate about creating two Webs - one low-speed Web and one faster and costlier - I could see so many middle-class folks getting shut out rather rapidly. It's the gentrification of the Web, and while my family and I can swing it now without much pinch in the pocketbook, if it were to rise to $100 a month in the years to come, I'll be whistling a different tune then. 

I can see it how - just like "Remember when water was free?" it'll be, "Remember when the Web was?"

CitySolver
CitySolver  
5/21/2014 8:31:46 AM
User Rank Blogger
Variety
Without wishing to sound trite, I think its important to note that there is no one simple answer to the urban living debate. Indeed, I am glad there isn't. As long as people have the choice to live in a flat, house, apartment etc then thats ok. I think we need far greater variety in our urban developments, especially housing, so that like the Prince of Wales experiment 'Poundbury' there are a number of house types. I am not saying it has to look like vernacular, but giving people in an area the option to live in a new terraced property, a flat, or a detached house, wil give neighbourhoods variety socially as well as aesthetically which is far more important than any architectural debate, and thats coming from an architecture graduate.

Walter Fieuw
Walter Fieuw  
5/14/2014 12:10:50 PM
User Rank Blogger
Activating spaces
Great blog Kim!

While I was reading I was thinking about the relationship between the digital divide on the one hand, and how segregated our cities are on the other. It seems like there are connections, notwithstanding the mobility of technology, which will probably continue to innovate and evolve in coming years. 

I fully agree with your sentiments on the barrage of all the Smart City lingo that appears all over these days. It seems as if social and public life is seperated from the scale of technological reforms - as if anything that does not fit the "smart city discourse" - big data, sensors all over, responsive government, etc - is some how NOT SMART? As if socialising urban space is somehow not in step with modern trends?

City life is messy, as you point out. But I still think that we are overlooking the ingenious ways in which poor / lower income city dwellers are carving out public spaces in increasingly competetive land markets to make a living. I wonder what technology will mean to these real time challenges that poor people face, otherwise the digital divide will entrench the existing spatial and urban divides too. 

kq4ym
kq4ym  
5/14/2014 11:30:56 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: It's as much a matter of mind
The psychology and states of mind of citizens should be something that paid more attention. While, we all figure in the end the "market" will rule, giving us the best of the best, I'm not so sure that applies to just how our cities make us feel as we work and play in them.

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