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Jane's Walk: Scale & Space in Downtown Manhattan

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Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
5/30/2014 2:47:35 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Whose city?
HA, for real? Robert Moses' footprint is a lasting one. The fact that he did not drive is a sadly hilarious historic footnote. 

A big portion of DC is also cut off from the rest by a large and unsightly highway. Interesting, the Nationals Stadium has triggered a gigantic burst of construction on the south side of the Southeast Freeway, as well as the redevelopment of some long-neglected waterfront into a vibrant greenspace that features a battleship and a soaring pedestrian bridge. The psychological barrier has been somewhat dismantled. 

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
5/30/2014 2:44:00 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Jane's Walks
I have passed Tweed Courthouse before, but never appreciated its overblown scale until now, so thanks, Kim. Also interesting is the physical relief you felt as the buildings receded in size. I felt exhausted all the time the years I lived in NYC; I thought it was because I was also broke and it was always loud, but maybe I was just feeling really tiny. 

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
5/21/2014 5:33:26 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Jane's Walks
We have some of the most beautiful buildings boarded up. Hopefully they can be restored and not turned down as our City become repopulated.

Toby
Toby  
5/13/2014 5:44:48 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Whose city?
Yes, that's the one, quite a read and quite an eye opener. It is amazing just how much municiple history hinges around individuals regardless of how much they run against the common will of the people.

kq4ym
kq4ym  
5/12/2014 1:23:11 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Jane's Walks
An interesting commentary on the walk. And the graphic of the Tweed Courthouse certainly quickly illustrates the scale difference in buildings vs people. If only more cities could sponsor such events, and spread the work via video to more people, our cities spaces would certainly be more appreciated and studied.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
5/12/2014 12:48:40 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Whose city?
Was that the Caro bio of Moses? I'm ashamed to say that's been on my reading list for several years now.

Kim Davis
Kim Davis  
5/12/2014 12:47:55 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Jane's Walks
Thanks, Llewyn.  I don't know Starett City and I should check it out. Brownsville and East New York remain poor areas, but they are at least not as dilapidated and dangerous as they once were.  I can remember a time when Harlem's streets were lined with boarded up buildings, and stores had signs scrawled on sheets of cardboard. Quite the gentrified neighborhood these days.

Toby
Toby  
5/12/2014 8:27:29 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Whose city?
Interesting article. I read a biography of Robert Moses a while back, that was an eye-opener. There was a man on a mission, a mission to redefine NYC as a motor city. His legacy and the damage it did is still with the city today in the fomr of the CBE and other interstates he ran through the once pleasant environs of the city. However progress has a price. Fortunately his plan to slice lower Manhattan in half with a huge highway from east to west was halted by concerned citizens who realized what he was trying to do. The kicker is he was a man who did not drive.

lewyn
lewyn  
5/7/2014 2:52:04 PM
User Rank Burgher
Re: Jane's Walks
I went on a Jane's Walk of Starrett City (subsidized housing at the east end of Brooklyn)- though actually, the most interesting part of the day was earlier in the morning when I walked through Brownsville and East New York, two poorer areas nearby.  I was surprised by how non-ominous they seemed compared to other cities where poorer areas are often full of boarded-up buildings or even "urban prairie" where there are almost no buildings at all.

NewDream
NewDream  
5/6/2014 8:39:47 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Jane's Walks
I don't think there's anything like this in Fort Lauderdale, either, but it is a great idea and your description, Kim, was fascinating.

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