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Chicago Installs Sensors With Artistic Flair

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CitySolver
CitySolver  
7/31/2014 10:10:01 AM
User Rank Blogger
Knowledge for whom?
Thats a great point, who will use the knowledge? We think nothing of giving our details to the police, but should data collected on health without our knowledge for instance be given to a chemical firm to develop a new drug? Is that justifiable?

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
7/29/2014 2:41:31 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
It's a Kinder, Gentler Sensor, Alan. It's a sensor wrapped in kittens and rainbows.

Embedding sensors in art somehow makes this whole thing more palatable then, say, some ominous IP camera mounted on a pole in Times Square that is feeding images back to the NYPD command center.  Of course those cameras are not there to generate warm fuzzies, nor even to be necessarily seen, but rather to head off a potential incident that could harm a lot of people, or buiid case post-incident (see Boston Marathon bombing).

The data being collected by the sensors in Chicago is generally speaking far more innocuous than that being generated by the cameras NYPD has positioned all over the darn place. I wonder if that will always be the case. 

NewDream
NewDream  
7/29/2014 10:30:49 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
Peter J, although you are right that "we give give away small amounts of privacy without realizing that it's slowly vanishing," in many ways we do not have a choice. Our privacy is taken away without our permission, often without our knowledge. And as tech advances that trend will continue, simply because it is possible.

I think the total loss of privacy is inevitable, in fact. The only question is when it will happen, not whether.

My concern is what will be done with the knowledge.

PeterJ
PeterJ  
7/29/2014 10:12:05 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
Indeed...but the data=$ equation in htis landscape often dismisses "the right thing to do." And unfortunately, it seems like we give give away small amounts of privacy without realizing that it's slowly vanishing.

NewDream
NewDream  
7/29/2014 9:55:13 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
If only judgmental attitudes would go away too... I still like my privacy and hate to see it go but if everyone accepted and respected others the loss would not be as painful.

NewDream
NewDream  
7/29/2014 9:55:12 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
If only judgmental attitudes would go away too... I still like my privacy and hate to see it go but if everyone accepted and respected others the loss would not be as painful.

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
7/29/2014 9:38:07 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: The Public
Good point, NewDream. That makes sense. But I'm sure there would massive public pushback if the city tried to sell that data. Or maybe not... who knows. We're getting so used to living our lives in public. Who was it who said there's no privacy anymore... ?

NewDream
NewDream  
7/29/2014 9:25:47 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The Public
I love the idea.

Re: your question to Alan... A corporation might pay for exclusive access to the data...would the city be willing to restrict public access and sell it to the highest bidder? This may be an issue, down the road.

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
7/29/2014 4:22:47 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: The Public
what if a large corporation offers the city millions of dollars to obtain information from the network?

If the data is already publicly available, Alan, why would a corporation offer to pay for it. They can use it free of charge, no?

As for the art element, I agree with Amy, that's really a delightful twist. 

Alan Reiter
Alan Reiter  
7/28/2014 3:29:03 PM
User Rank Blogger
Re: The Public
Hi Amy,

I never used Bump, although I knew about it. Perhaps the company sold itself to Google because the app wasn't good enough.

As for the pandas, I seem to remember, very vaguely, their existence. You're right, they might have been a good venue for sensors, assuming the pandas were in the appropriate locations for the type of data the city would have wanted to collect.

I think covering sensors with artwork is a good idea, as long as people know that sensors are underneath. It shouldn't be done to hide them from public scrutiny, but that's not what Chicago is doing. The government wants people to know about the sensors, to develop apps and use the public data. 

As I noted, perhaps it will encourage people to consider the role of sensors and ponder their implications as they become more capable over the years.

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