Partners
HOME    BLOGS    BLOGGERS    MESSAGES    VIDEO    AUDIO    REPORTS    RESEARCH    WEBINARS

Lessons From Singapore's Water Independence

Newest First    Oldest First    Threaded View
Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
4/18/2013 11:52:45 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Water use
This is all really excellent, Cecilia. Thanks for the reply. I think we'll see that in the coming years Singapore will serve as the model to point to as the go-to example for water sustainability, much in the way that Copenhagen is the model for cities looking to become pedestrian friendly and walkable.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
4/18/2013 9:49:36 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Foreign investment
Terrific effort going into the water sector in Singapore for sure. I think all this is repeatable anywhere. All it takes is backing from the right authorities and investors to make this kind of initiative a reality.

CitySolver
CitySolver  
4/18/2013 9:09:58 AM
User Rank Blogger
Clean Water
It sounds like we need to do this in the UK. We still have sirty rivers despite regulation and I can imagine more investment along the River Mersey near me, if it was clean and useable. Interesting article, we need to learn from this in the West certainly.

Cecilia Tortajada
Cecilia Tortajada  
4/18/2013 7:22:40 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Foreign investment
Singapore and the national water agency (the Public Utilities Board) are very pro-business; encourage the companies that are starting and fund schemes for both fundamental and applied research. To give an idea of the investment in R%D, the Environment & Water Industry Programme Office (EWI) has committed S$470 million from 2006 for R&D purposes in the water sector. There are around 100 water industries in the city-state and the international projects are worth to around S$9 billion. As you correctly mention, Singapore's water strategies are serving as kind of seed funding for the future of sustainable water techniques elsewhere. This makes worth considering (1) visiting Singapore; (2) participating in the Singapore International Water Week where, among others, thousands of industries gather, and (3) see the work of Water Hub and its support to the water industries.

Cecilia Tortajada
Cecilia Tortajada  
4/18/2013 7:04:28 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Water use
The National Water Agency has set very stringent parametres for tap water, and they are as high as those in any developed city. NEWater is basically for industrial purpose and, in small percentages, for non-direct potable use, which means it is added to the reservoirs and then treated. NEWater has passed more than 65,000 scientific tests and its quality is much higher than the WHO recommended standards. There has also been a very comprehensive communication strategy to inform the public on the objectives of NEWater, processes, reliability, etc. The so-called NEWater Visitor Centre is worth visiting since it provides extensive information for all those interested. 

 

 

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
4/17/2013 5:55:00 PM
User Rank Staff
Foreign investment
Great post! I'm wondering whether the foreign investment in Singapore's water strategies is serving as kind of a seed funding for the future of sustainable water techniques elsewhere. In other words, vendors of sustainable water products can use contracts in Singapore to trial and prove out the viability of their wares.

Singapore could be a proving ground for sustainable water technologies.

stotheco
stotheco  
4/17/2013 2:03:49 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Water use
I respect and admire Singapore for so many things, and this is just one of them. I believe that Singapore and her water story should serve as a guide and inspiration to all other cities aspiring for the same independence.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
4/17/2013 1:02:27 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Water use
Thanks for the reply, Cecilia, and for the link and book information as well.

Was there pushback from the community about drinking treated wastewater?

Cecilia Tortajada
Cecilia Tortajada  
4/16/2013 9:40:09 PM
User Rank Blogger
Water use
Reservoirs, from where water is supplied, includes water from the catchment areas, imported water, desalinated water and a small percentage of NEWater. This water is then treated at the waterworks and distributed to the users.

An overall analysis of plans, policies, water demand and supply strategies, pricing, laws and institutions, etc., can be found in our latest book on Singapore water and wastewater management: The Singapore Water Story: Sustainable Development in an Urban City-State.

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415657839/

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
4/16/2013 12:36:58 PM
User Rank Staff
Inspiring
Thanks for an insightful and inspiring post, Cecilia. This all sounds like truly remarkable progress, and you're right to say that there are lessons to extract here.

Of the different water types you mention, which serves as the source of drinking water for the people of Singapore?

more blogs from Cecilia Tortajada
research
Smart City Money Makers
companies and solutions that are most prominent, and destined to be most profitable, in the smart city revolution.
How to Make Your City Smarter
Cities all over the world need to become smarter and more sustainable. But where to start? Download this guide to learn the first, proven steps toward making your city smarter.
all research
quick poll
Join the discussion
All polls
twitter feed
Future Cities Twitter Feed
follow us on facebook
Site Moderators
Future Cities is looking for engaged readers to moderate the message boards on this site. Engage in high-IQ conversations; earn kudos and perks. Interested? E-mail:
moderators@ubmfuturecities.com
directory
Designed to provide the people with access to green building products all year round
connect to us
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2014 UBM,
All rights reserved.