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Does Climate Change Pose a Security Risk?

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Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
8/27/2014 9:53:28 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Here comes the flood
Susan, I think it's partly because some folks view doing anything to protect or conserve environmental resources as tantamount to being anti-business. Fearmongering by some politicians about job losses, etc. can only serve to instill panic on the coal miner or rancher or other person whose livelihood appears to depends on a laxity, if you will, in environmental regs. 

When I see efforts to promote jobs in wind power, or solar power, to help ensure a different kind of employment for people who are understandably concerned about keeping a regular paycheck coming, I feel that's one step in the right direction. 

Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
8/15/2014 10:04:44 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Missing land
I once read that the climate changes in cycles, like 50 years of floods and 50 years of dry land in a location. We may want to look at old climate, location specific building patterns and methods, such as houses built on stilts or communities of boat houses. The world is not the same and one solution does not fit everywhere. With the technology we have today I am sure man can live in harmony with the earth and each other.....well maybe ...

Toby
Toby  
8/4/2014 6:47:39 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Missing land
Fascinating article and I am not in the least surprised to hear the discusion has been reduced from the level of thoughtful dialog to partisan bickering by the politico who have aligned themsleves one way or the other...in the end all politics is local. How many islands are we losing the way of the one in the Bay of Bengal I wonder....How about Long Island?

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
8/4/2014 6:19:15 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Here comes the flood
Thanks for the link to that EPA article, Amy. The argument of the protesting United Mine Workers is classic: Since the EPA's rule to lower carbon by 30 percent by 2030 will do little to address climate change globally, better to do nothing at all.

The reasoning that stumps me, though, is that even if someone is a climate change skeptic, why not protect the environment for its own sake -- reduce pollution for quality of life reasons and for future generations....

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
8/4/2014 5:31:46 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Security
It's true that nothing is going to be as fast as a military strike, CitySolver. But the NYTimes piece cites the case of Mali where drought and the expanding Sahara desert are eating up arable land at such a pace that it's causing starvation and has fed the rise of Islamic militants, who now control the north of the country. That all happened in just a couple of years.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
8/1/2014 12:37:02 PM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Here comes the flood
The 6-year recession we're currently in, recovering from, or left in the dust (take your partisan pick) has provided additional cover to climate change deniers, who use any environmental policy discussion as a platform to remind us of the job-killing effect of any new controls. I don't expect this dynamic to end any time soon, but I look forward to a new conversation that's larger than the current "we can't/we won't" ideology that's reduced some policymakers to pouty 3 year-olds not getting their way.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
7/31/2014 2:57:44 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Here comes the flood
And Rhode Island... or Japan.. or Venice.. or...

Of course there are security implications, and Projjal laid out some here that I had yet to start worrying about. Um, thanks, I think. But when no one with the potential to actually respond to climate change is able to do anything because of clashing ideologies, what is the concerned layperson to do? Turn off the lights? Walk more? Invest in sandbags? How on earth will it add up to ever being enough?

The EPA's attempts to respond put some industries on the defensive. As we see in this article and in the House's refusal to earmark funds, in the tension between current threats and future threats (which actually may turn out to be current - see Katrina, Sandy, California's dwindling water resources, etc.), current perceived threats seem to always win out.

 

 

Davedgreat2000
Davedgreat2000  
7/31/2014 10:20:17 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Climate Change and Security
Many years ago i've read articles on Climate Change and the risks associated with it. With rising Temps, ice melting, Growing seasons becoming shorter. loss of fresh water...etc. etc. Civil unrest begins, riots for food and water. Fuel for vehicles becoming very expensive, Millions of people migrating to the largest of cities to not only find food and water but for work and places to live. The ariticle stated a single family home now played host to multiple families (2-4 families).

With mass migration of people comes the closing of boarders leading to limited wars.

The list went on and on.

all we have to look at is the Department of Defense in the US has studied this as well as many differnet Think Tanks. They all expect civil unrest and limited wars to happen over Climate Change.  

 

CitySolver
CitySolver  
7/31/2014 10:05:14 AM
User Rank Blogger
Security
I couldnt agree more. while the topic is indeed worthy of study and vigilence, the idea that climate change will be a looming security risk I feel is a bit too much. There will be unrest over flooding etc but can displaced people really mobilise the strength to create a security risk. I feel that the time scale is too extended to have the same reaction as say a military strike.

kq4ym
kq4ym  
7/30/2014 5:20:39 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Here comes the flood
The security implications of climate change are indeed worthy of study. But, in our paranoid and more and more secretive government corners, national security issues have become the latest fighting words to separate otherwise reasonable men and women. Keeping party allegiencies separtated by the far corners of the political conference rooms has become commonplace, no matter how important the issue. Can't we all come to our senses?

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