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10 Traits of 'Globally Fluent' Cities

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Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
11/5/2013 12:16:06 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: DC's constant influx of new faces...
Indeed it will take time, @stotheco. My hope is that we still have time for it to happen.

stotheco
stotheco  
11/5/2013 11:47:20 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: DC's constant influx of new faces...
I agree, Mary. Although it sounds like a lot of things need to be overhauled. I'm not sure this will even happen, but what I'm sure of is that it will take a lot of time.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
11/4/2013 10:51:12 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: DC's constant influx of new faces...
Yes, Rich. Politics would be #1, but working for the government in a civil-servant capacity - lawyer at Labor, economist at EPA, analyst at DoD - is not far behind. Maybe even neck and neck with those aligned to elected officials. 

Next up would be all the associations, think tanks and lobbying groups, from NEA to Cato Institute to AARP. They are always seeking fresh blood :-)

richheap
richheap  
11/4/2013 2:46:52 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Global, schmobal
That's a fair point, Terry. I like the description "broad and squishy". Is that because of the report itself or because I've had to fit it into a short blog post? Probably a bit of both.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
11/4/2013 12:48:44 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Global, schmobal
Thanks for your reply, Rich. I think the problem here is the term global fluency, which even after reviewing the 10 traits in the report you linked to, leaves me even more puzzled. I found the traits and desicriptions so broad and squishy that they could be made to apply to virtually any urban center on the planet.

richheap
richheap  
11/3/2013 3:36:47 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Global, schmobal
@Terry: The report doesn't suggest anywhere that only English-speaking cities have these traits. Even though it picked these countries as case studies, it also lists around five other cities - both English-speaking and non-English-speaking - alongside each case study that also demonstrate these traits.

And I don't see the problem with not including Shanghai and Hong Kong as a main case study. This isn't a list of the ten most globally fluent cities, on which you'd expect one or both to feature. A case study city could be a great example of one of these traits but not be "globally fluent" if it doesn't meet the other none criteria. I don't really see the problem. Have I missed your point?

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
11/1/2013 3:20:13 PM
User Rank Blogger
Global, schmobal
Are we to assume there's only one language at work here -- English (duh!) -- and that a "globally fluent" city sucks it up and conducts business and creates signage only in English?

Also, glaring by their omission are Shanghai and Hong Kong, two of the most globally fluent and commercially vibrant cities on the planet. In contrast, the inclusion of Brisbane and Tel Aviv just seems gratuitous and silly, and really undercuts the point of this '10 Traits' list.

CitySolver
CitySolver  
11/1/2013 1:11:55 PM
User Rank Blogger
Specialism and collaborating
I think the Indian example is one that highlights the essence of a stable economic system that we could have globally. With so much global competition at all economic levels it makes sense for countries to further their counties by specialising in certain areas. If this was done more often we would have more trade and less fluctuating of supply and demand. I think its time the UK learnt the lessons of history and became a world beater in IT rather than competing with other counties in the Service based economy. If we did this we would not have such high unemployment perhaps.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
11/1/2013 9:30:46 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: DC's constant influx of new faces...
I'm with those who think we need shorter terms or a different approach, @PeterJ. We seem to get stuck in a rut too often when it comes to some officials, and it may be worth examining whether our US system itself needs reform -- eg, the ability to call elections on a vote of no confidence, etc., not just for the president but other officials.

richheap
richheap  
11/1/2013 7:13:56 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: DC's constant influx of new faces...
That's interesting, Amy. If cities are going to attract new talent then they need something to draw them in, and in a lot of cases that'll be where they can do the work they want to. If someone wants to get involved in international politics or political lobbying then Washington DC seems a good place to do that. Would you say that politics is the city's specialist sector (in a similar way as IT is the specialist sector in Bangalore)?

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