Partners
HOME    BLOGS    BLOGGERS    MESSAGES    VIDEO    AUDIO    REPORTS    RESEARCH    WEBINARS

New York Parks Present Funding Conundrum

Mary Jander, Managing Editor, Future Cities
Thursday, February 20, 2014 07:00 EST

14
Newest First    Oldest First    Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
CitySolver
CitySolver  
2/26/2014 8:55:22 AM
User Rank Blogger
percentage
I agree Mary, when you look at the acreage of the highline it is 6 acres compared to hundereds of acres for Central and Prospect Park. On a purely Biodiversity front, its obvious we must make more of our traditional parks and keep them green. Though as you say the Highline is a vital link to these bigger spaces. What I personally dont like is landscape architects dressing up green spaces with concrete planters and architectural (but ecologically useless) planting. Our cities should demand more than just minimalist planting schemes in favour of large swaths of natural space that is beautiful as it is. There is a place for Architectural style planting but my point is that we must never lose sight of the intrinsic value of overgrown woodland, or untamed heath plants etc. Its a balance I agree. But we must protect and even improve the assets that were given to our cities for the people and for nature.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/25/2014 2:01:52 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: park space percentage
Certainly, there needs to be effort to balance support of green space in a city, whether that's a HighLine style park or a bigger, more traditionally laid out space. How that balance is best achieved is a question, though.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/25/2014 1:59:29 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Is there a pattern here?
Good question, @PeterJ, and one I don't immediately know the answer to. I do know that corporations, like individuals, can donate to any public park in the city without going through a conservancy. Are they doing so in any substantial way? I am not sure, but it's worth examining.

CitySolver
CitySolver  
2/25/2014 12:39:22 PM
User Rank Blogger
park space percentage
Just a side point ot an interesting article- The size of parks like Prospect Park and Central Park are far bigger than places like the highline (elegant as it is). So its important to invest in the bread and butter of green infrastructure (the traditional parks) as it is to invest in green corridors. I am passionate about green corridors but what this article highlights to me is this:- What is the value in green corridors if the green hubs they lead to are under funded and poorly maintained. In my own city of Liverpool this is an issue. see my article- http://www.ubmfuturecities.com/author.asp?section_id=374&doc_id=523971

PeterJ
PeterJ  
2/25/2014 10:14:53 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Is there a pattern here?
Terry, your point is especially on target given the NYC tax rate and lack of investment and preservation of parks/open space as a public trust. These areas belong to residents for all to enjoy - and for equity in distribution.

PeterJ
PeterJ  
2/25/2014 10:10:01 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: It's not that complicated
Yes, we see that in Providence, RI as well, in the beautiful Roger Williams Park & Zoo. It does, however, receive direct city support for many programs and services - but there is financing through revenue generated from the zoo. When groups use the park, they must also pay certain fees for maintenance, security, etc.

PeterJ
PeterJ  
2/25/2014 10:05:59 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Is there a pattern here?
Mary, I'm wondering about the level of corporate committment to parks throughout the city. Does this funnel through the private financing/conservancy arms, too? This is not to say that there should be a reliance on this kind of support alone, but it is probably part of the equation.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/24/2014 9:49:49 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: It's not that complicated
Good point, Terry. I wonder whether part of the problem isn't that NYC has so many wealthy benefactors ready to pony up big bucks for pet parks that it makes us forget the paltry public funding for the smaller ones.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/24/2014 9:47:45 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Is there a pattern here?
@Terry: Something to think about. It seems we may have gotten pretty forgetful, blase, complacent, or whatever. We no longer notice this. Reliance on private funding may have started as a trend, but apparently it's become the norm in NYC.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
2/22/2014 12:06:37 AM
User Rank Blogger
It's not that complicated
I'm pretty shocked that you all seem to be giving the city a pass on this; the municipal government has essentially punted on this to whoever might pony up (Benefactor X, Billionaire Y, Conservancy Z)? It's puzzling to me that there isn't more outrage, given the justifiable pride NYers take in Central Park, the Highline, Prospect Park, to name just a few.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
today's cartoon
 | 
contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click here
Wait till you see the one they put next to the tracks…
Cartoon Archive
research
Smart City Money Makers
companies and solutions that are most prominent, and destined to be most profitable, in the smart city revolution.
How to Make Your City Smarter
Cities all over the world need to become smarter and more sustainable. But where to start? Download this guide to learn the first, proven steps toward making your city smarter.
all research
quick poll
Join the discussion
All polls
twitter feed
Future Cities Twitter Feed
follow us on facebook
Site Moderators
Future Cities is looking for engaged readers to moderate the message boards on this site. Engage in high-IQ conversations; earn kudos and perks. Interested? E-mail:
moderators@ubmfuturecities.com
directory
Designed to provide the people with access to green building products all year round
connect to us
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2014 UBM,
All rights reserved.