Partners
HOME    BLOGS    BLOGGERS    MESSAGES    VIDEO    AUDIO    REPORTS    RESEARCH    WEBINARS

The 7 Urban Underdogs of the USA

Newest First    Oldest First    Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Resurgent phoenix
Resurgent phoenix  
2/6/2014 7:02:35 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: Tech injection needed, perhaps
True Mary, what will really grow a City is the ability to produce something in high demand. Detroit is know for the Henry Ford era of immigration the City grew during that era. Detroit also had eras of thriving as it produced potbelly stoves and stained glass windows. The future innovations are going to be interesting....and maybe something other than tech......

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/3/2014 10:35:15 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Tech injection needed, perhaps
Well, attracting tech companies seems to be everyone's solution, but it hasn't always worked. Case in point: Detroit's big push to attract startups didn't keep it out of bankruptcy court.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
2/3/2014 10:00:25 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Maryland: The New Detroit
Hi Terry: I too wondered about this. The only thing I can figure is that this area of Maryland hasn't been the focus on government subsidies or attention, as have the other rust belt cities. That's just speculation.

PeterJ
PeterJ  
1/31/2014 5:02:51 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Tech injection needed, perhaps
Nicole, I've read recently about the wide economic effect of tech in the SF Bay Area, particularly the criticism of how highly paid employees have stretched housing affordability in that area. I'm just wondering what happens if tech migrates in the years to come? How does a large city and surrounding suburbs react to that kind of thing? I suppose there is still huge investment in that area, including Apple's proposed spaceship headquarters. My thought here is that it almost correlates to a product life cycle, and there needs to be some replacement planning to fill the void.

PeterJ
PeterJ  
1/31/2014 4:56:59 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Where have all the people gone?
Yes, Mary. It has really been the loss of some of these generational companies/industries that have altered the landscapes - literally and figuratively - of these areas. I also think of a place like Rochester, NY after the demise of Eastman Kodak. I guess we look for diversity in micro economies, but it is often not the case in where we live and results in high risk to these communities.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
1/31/2014 3:28:46 PM
User Rank Staff
Tech injection needed, perhaps
Depressing list... it seems clear to me that each of these regions needs to figure out what its next industry is going to be. I believe that getting a start-up culture going, and attracting more tech companies, could turn things around.

The cities in Maryland may want to go bang on Ike Leggett's door in Montgomery County for some advice.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
1/31/2014 2:56:50 AM
User Rank Blogger
Maryland: The New Detroit
Maybe I don't really understand the criteria at work here, but it's surprising to see Maryland taking up so much of this list. I won't argue about whether there's stagnation or decay in MD; it's just that there are so many other possibilities across the Rust Belt. Sandusky, anyone? Buffalo? Allentown? Maybe these faded beauty queens got written off a long time ago. It's just a little odd to see a state like MD dominate this list.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
1/30/2014 12:38:27 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Where have all the people gone?
A weird thing seems to happen to beautiful places that no longer sustain urban growth. Older folk or people who can afford to bring their own money move in, younger people move out. This trend can keep a region afloat for a long time in a "stasis" mode that isn't really going anywhere.

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
1/30/2014 12:25:24 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Where have all the people gone?
Really interesting list. I have been to all those places in Maryland, and one block from boarded-up blight will be totally hip coffee shops or attractive historic sites, like the Hagerstown bandshell. You can almost see the push and pull of economic success or failure playing out in real time before your eyes. 

I know retirees who have bought second homes in places like H'town, and I know of younger folks who have fled them for greater opportunities in Washington or Richmond. The forces seem to be at stasis, for the most part. 

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
1/30/2014 10:09:22 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Where have all the people gone?
Great point, PeterJ. Often, a key business or employee leaves, or more devastatingly, an industry itself pulls up and leaves the town that grew up around it without its anchor.

Many cities in the Appalachian area grew up around coal mining and manufacturing, so when those industries pulled up stakes, the result was an outmigration that gradually left these cities virtual ghosttowns -- at least, compared to their previous state.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
research
Smart City Money Makers
companies and solutions that are most prominent, and destined to be most profitable, in the smart city revolution.
How to Make Your City Smarter
Cities all over the world need to become smarter and more sustainable. But where to start? Download this guide to learn the first, proven steps toward making your city smarter.
all research
quick poll
Join the discussion
All polls
twitter feed
Future Cities Twitter Feed
follow us on facebook
Site Moderators
Future Cities is looking for engaged readers to moderate the message boards on this site. Engage in high-IQ conversations; earn kudos and perks. Interested? E-mail:
moderators@ubmfuturecities.com
directory
Designed to provide the people with access to green building products all year round
connect to us
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2014 UBM,
All rights reserved.