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IBM: City Analytics Is Key Trend

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Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/24/2013 1:18:18 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Analytics
Well, in fairness, no big IT project is typically the work of just one vendor, and most vendors are fine with that. I've heard many offer at least two customers willing to testify to any solution they propose to a prospective user. The would-be client is free to contact those other users privately to get the full story.

Thanks for the link! It's still great to see the initiative for a new tech solution coming from within a municipal organization, no matter what brand of products are used to get it going.

mejiac
mejiac  
12/24/2013 12:57:29 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Analytics
@Mary Jander,

Agreed,

And many times, it's the company that spearheads a project (IBM, Siemens, Oracle, Microsoft) that do promote the implement solution. Here's an interesting article about an e-Learning initiative in New Delhi.

We can safely assume that the amount of effort to build the e-learning platform was substantial, since it would be available to everyone.

Just an example of an implemented solution.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/24/2013 12:50:24 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Analytics
Agree totally, @mejiac, that successful implementations and pilots that other cities can point to will be essential to getting analytics underway. In the private sector, most IT projects don't get anywhere unless there are testimonials to support the undertaking -- ones that aren't biased by vendors, either.

mejiac
mejiac  
12/24/2013 10:52:21 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Analytics
@Mary Jander,

 

"The only holdup, as I see it, will be funding and skepticism from cities that really don't understand what's on offer."

I think once some pilot cities start implementing this approach, and show hard data of the level of savings and optimization that can occur, it might help in getting others onboard.

Also, like IBM and other companies, customization will be essential, since every city will have it's existing systems.

mejiac
mejiac  
12/24/2013 10:50:05 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Analytics
@Nicole,

Agreed.

I can already imagine a scenario where you have an emergency, and because of the analytics and having traffic systems online (along with emergency responders) you'd be able to coordinate efforts the same way a traffic controllers is able to drive airline traffice and have a clear view of the entire picture.

mejiac
mejiac  
12/24/2013 10:48:14 AM
User Rank Village Voice
If you can meassure it, you can improve it
Great Article Mary!,

"Once cities are shown how technology can improve efficiencies in areas such as traffic, water, energy, emergency response, and city services, they're ready to try it, she says."

I think this is the key to the success of this approach, by having some cities deploy this proto type solutions (thus learn and get the bugs and fixes) other cities will follow.

I think this is no different when you have intelligent/green buildings that monitor temperature, time and weather to make adjustments accordingly.

 

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/19/2013 12:11:09 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: NY Times agrees...
Your comment brought something up for me, @hfreeman17: analytics don't always have to involve enormous projects. Some of the urban hackathons have produced incredibly useful and interesting smaller publicly accessible and free apps from city data.

This isn't to downplay the role of more sophisticated, IT-driven analytics projects. But it is possible to apply similar principles on a smaller scale.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/19/2013 12:08:37 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Analytics
Indeed, once cities see how analytics can be applied to their problems, they're usually on board. I think awareness is probably key here; naturally, IBM's expertise and determination helps keep the bandwagon rolling, and other suppliers have been jumping onboard as fast as they can.

The only holdup, as I see it, will be funding and skepticism from cities that really don't understand what's on offer.

hfreeman17
hfreeman17  
12/18/2013 11:58:11 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
NY Times agrees...
Great post, Mary.

And it corroborates what the NY Times cited a couple days ago in Dealbook, that NYC, for example, will see less growth of professionals in the finance sector and more in the tech sector.  We're seeing that even now.

I think also of tools like Livehoods and its aggregation of passively generated data like FourSquare check-ins, making it possible for urbanists to interpret those data.  Cities are most certainly tech incubators and drivers of new kinds of analytics.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/17/2013 4:33:04 PM
User Rank Staff
Analytics
IBM has definitely been the leader here in terms of demonstrating how smart city tech can truly change the future for the better. We often talk about too much tech in cities, but applying analytics to elements like water and energy use, as well as to transportation, and emergency response, strikes me as not only a no-brainer, but absolutely essential.

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