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Urban Tech Startups Need Support

Mary Jander, Managing Editor, Future Cities
Thursday, December 12, 2013 08:00 EST

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Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/18/2013 1:29:20 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Urban Tech
Gotcha, Venks. Thanks. I do think we may want to study up a bit before we minimize the impact of something like desalinizing ocean water, though. I'm not so sure, given the potential volume of water we'd need, that it would be spoonfuls. Hopefully, technology will emege that provides us with fresh water without killing us in other ways.

Venks
Venks  
12/18/2013 1:22:03 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
Yup Mary, I see your point of view here and agree with it. But even then, I dont see any issue by taking out water from the ocean. I feel its just like taking out a small spoon of water from a tank having capacity of thousands of litres! I was speaking from that point of view.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/18/2013 12:46:23 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Urban Tech
Agreed that humans have always been dependent on nature, @Venks, but there is a big difference between interdependence and wanton destruction. We can't rationalize what we've been doing for the past century on the basis of "nature made us that way."

Venks
Venks  
12/18/2013 12:40:38 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
don't see the benefit of taking more resources where we've already done so much damage.


Mary: I agree with you but, then having said that, humans were always dependent on nature for its survival. Its been happening since time immemorial and it will happen in future also. Thats how the cycle works, I guess. Even the law of conservation of energy states that, 'Energy can neither be created nor destroyed but can only be transferred one form to another'.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/16/2013 5:58:55 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Urban Tech
Not quite sure how I feel about desal. On one hand, if we could limit the amount of salt water  we take from the ocean and it's cost effective, fine. On the other, I, like Nicole, don't see the benefit of taking more resources where we've already done so much damage.

I think wastewater treatment sounds most promising.

Venks
Venks  
12/15/2013 1:52:04 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
My sense is just that there are other ways for us to get water -- wastewater treatment is one; taking water from the air is another.


Nicole,

Waste water treatment: Are we ready for it yet? An article in Future cities few months ago on the same topic, highlighted the fact that some Australian might not even wash their cars with such water.

Taking water from the air:It is a very costly affair when it comes to producing in large scale. Plus, it has its own problems like it affects the nature of the climate dramatically in its local surroundings and hence affecting the flora and fauna of that region.

I guess we might have to look for some more alternatives while still keeping focussed on  working on these above mentioned points.

kq4ym
kq4ym  
12/14/2013 5:12:31 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
The "sharing city" idea seems to foretell a brigher future as governments cooperate to provide services to their urban areas and which should and could include helping to fund or support tech startups with the possibility of not only supporting green initiatives but a share of the gains from the profitability, energy savings and urban improvements resulting from the efforts of the companies supported.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/13/2013 3:29:19 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Urban Tech
Davedgreat: Thanks for the reply. I know that San Diego was getting set to build a desal plant; but then I think I heard that wastewater treatment may be the way forward there instead. That may be an indicator that desal is just too hard and expensive to do. I do hear your point, though. This is something that needs to be figured out much sooner than later.

Davedgreat2000
Davedgreat2000  
12/13/2013 3:25:54 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
taking water from the Air...they do sell a device that does that for in home use, it creates 5 gallons of freshwater in about 10 hours or so, by pulling it out of the air. I think the cost of that device was about $1500-$3000. Not bad really. its basically a dehumidifyer.

Davedgreat2000
Davedgreat2000  
12/13/2013 3:23:59 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Urban Tech
@Nicole, I dont think we would be taking away so much more water from the Ocean and sealife as we think. First off we would have to build Desal plants all along the coast lines of America and other Nations. I dont think that would happen. I'm just talking about a few to help augment the already strained water supply we have today. to use the Desal water for Drinking and not for farming. Second, you are right the cost is great, so it probably wont happen anytime soon.

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