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2014 Priorities: Green Efforts, High; City IT, Low

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piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/20/2014 12:56:26 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Who Was Polled?
Often, in the realm of 'new' and pioneering technologies there are egos and massive amounts of marketing dollars at work.  I have witnessed that again and again from the early days of the Web to our current Cloud schemas.

The other issue is tech jargon; used *among* leaders/pioneers [both in quotes] amounting to technologies that promise much and deliver very little. . . . With cities and organizations hoping for the best while not grasping the fundamentals of what lies beneath the techno-speak.

mejiac
mejiac  
1/20/2014 9:17:35 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Who Was Polled?
@piratejulie,

Hopefully if any city reaches out to a company/single individual, is because of proven track record, where they are considered leaders and/or pioneers within there respective areas.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/18/2014 2:23:59 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Who Was Polled?
Indeed, IT is "not seen as part of a solution, just another tool in the toolbox."

The acronym SME, in this context is Subject Matter Expert, I'm guessing.  That can get difficult, almost from the start with so many sel-professed "gurus" most markedly, within IT/Computer spheres.

I agree, bona fide SME[s] would surely be beneficial but would the *real* SME please stand up!

mejiac
mejiac  
1/18/2014 1:57:39 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Who Was Polled?
@piratejulie, Great comment

@Nicole,

I think a reason IT may not some as the priority is maybe because it's not seen as part of a solution, just another tool in the toolbox.

This perception can change if a SME is part of the panel of decision makers, and is able to weigh in on solutions based on IT support.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/10/2014 11:55:11 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Who Was Polled?
@Nicole: A few days ago, I encountered a comment on Twitter regarding Data/Analytics.  He noted wanting to utilize both Data/Analytics by making Politicians more accountable; more ethical.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/10/2014 11:47:55 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Not surprising...
 "21st century challenges do not care about the jurisdictional dotted lines we have drawn on maps."  So very true.

And to say it in a 21st Century way may dilute the "arrogance" you reference.

So, here's a Tweet:

Connect these dots: Jurisdictions? Nope. Cognitive data? A must for ALL.

 

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
1/9/2014 4:27:16 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Who Was Polled?
I think so too, piratejulie. By the way, our new poll asks specifically about uses for urban analytics, and I'm really looking forward to having people weigh in and let us know where they'd like to see analytics applied in cities.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/8/2014 3:51:51 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Who Was Polled?
I wonder what your perception is of the top promises made by the "Smart Cities" movement.  As I understand it, it has become a 'movement' strongly linked to *specific* geographies/topographies.  That is, what is true for Los Angeles is not necessarily true for New York City.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
1/8/2014 3:43:25 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Who Was Polled?
@Nicole: If there was a way to poll those folks in IT about the specific values they assign to Smarter Cities/Governance as a function of their services/work; I think the results would be insightful. . . . Especially in this year of "Big Data!"

Rod
Rod  
1/8/2014 1:14:00 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Who Was Polled?
Julie,

There is a general concern for the environment as well as for the economy, as well as a more aspirational impulse to make cities better.  The challenge for all of these issues, be they reducing carbon, creating better jobs, or achieving the promises of the Smart City movement is the mismatch between who pays and who gets the benefits.   Yes, we'd like to see cities do more economic development; no, the cities won't make the investment because the return won't come until years after people leave office.  Yes, we'd like to see more efficient mass transit, with less time spent waiting out in the cold; no, there's not a return-on-investment, either electorally or in terms of increased ridership. 

 

The sweet spot for spending is problems that generate more revenue for those doing the spending, that improve the users experience, and that generate political capital for the public decision makers.  This last week has been full of news about how cities are doing at snow removal, and how poor performance in this area has cut short the career of many a mayor.  Somewhere there is probably a mayor willing to invest in "Smart Cities" applications for more efficient snow removal.  Success in the big issues will come after victory in concrete issues like this one.

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