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From the Mayor's Desk: Bloomberg's Emotional Goodbyes

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Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/11/2013 5:32:48 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Nice roundup
Hi PostSandy: Thanks, I'm glad you enjoyed it. Regarding Boris, I don't know if you watched the video, but he didn't actually agree to being tested. :) They just kind of fired three questions at him and wouldn't let him get away with not answering them.. ha. I'm sure he would have done better with a real IQ test (I hope!).

And yes, we do tend to take things for granted living in New York, don't we? Immigrants do not have it easy elsewhere in the US, unfortunately.

PostSandy
PostSandy  
12/11/2013 4:32:23 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Nice roundup
Nice roundup, Nicole. Mayor Boris was brave enough to openly be tested. I credit him for that. 

A Social Work professor who waited in line with me in the post office was just telling me about #1 of Mayor Bloomberg's speech. 

"New York must always strive to be the most open city in the world... Today, when people are sick or hurting and ask for assistance, we don't ask them for their immigration papers. We help them."

I did not know about this. I thought it were true in the whole United States. I guess I am taking a lot of things for granted living in New York. But hey, the income tax is high. :)

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/9/2013 3:00:19 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Bloomberg wins high marks
I hope not either, Mary, but I think it's realistic to expect a fair bit of that... I mean, we're already doing it!

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/9/2013 2:59:21 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Bloomberg wins high marks
Couldn't agree more, Terry... it's not surprising that Bloomberg (allegedly) tried to get Hillary Clinton to run for mayor. She's obviously someone with the political will to get things done, and the right contacts. I'm sure Bloomberg feels very protective over the changes he's brought to New York and fears what will happen to the city when it's put in less capable hands.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
12/9/2013 10:58:53 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Bloomberg wins high marks
I'll join the chorus of praise for Bloomberg. One thing: I do hope we don't have to keep returning to sing his praises in a regretful "good old days" way once the new administration is installed.

Hazel
Hazel  
12/9/2013 6:34:44 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Bloomberg wins high marks
I salute Bloomberg for his work, for the changes he initiated, and for his legacy. It's definitely going to be tough for his successor but I'm hoping the latter will be able to do better. All for the good of New York.

Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney  
12/9/2013 2:23:32 AM
User Rank Blogger
Bloomberg wins high marks
Totally agree in re Bloomberg being a tough act to follow. He was his own master, and led with his own values in a clear, consistent way. By any measure, he was very good for the city and leaves it a better place than when he first took office.

hfreeman17
hfreeman17  
12/6/2013 4:01:41 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Legacies
I have been and am a fan of Bloomberg's and also of the people he brought in and has retained.  I think of him as an excellent leader and manager and, more importantly, a visionary who gets things done.  He's like a hardscrabble Steve-Jobs-leading-a-city.

That said, there are two legacies that have been tough for broad sections of New York.

For parents of kids in public schools (like ours), his emphasis and that of Cathy Black's during her short tenure on charter schools often went against overwhelming majority sentiment against certain charter schools going in certain cachments.  I'm in favor of charter schools, but he/the DOE did not listen to residents.  Perhaps history will prove them right.  I hope so.

The other is "faith communities." If you are Muslim or Jewish, you are often protected.  But I must speak out for poor Christian churches, many of them Pentecostal/non-denominational/small/Hispanic/African-American and in other boroughs than Manhattan, which suffered when the DOE prohibited them from meeting in public school spaces on Sundays.  Again, having seen first-hand that the outraged critics had no real case against these churches meeting, it seemed the DOE caved to what was essentially acceptable anti-Christian bias.  There's really no other way to put it, and you've read enough comments from me to know that I'm not given to vituperative rants.

Again, big fan here.  I think history will prove him right on charter schools, but my faith is not generally welcomed here in the city.

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