Partners
HOME    BLOGS    BLOGGERS    MESSAGES    VIDEO    AUDIO    REPORTS    RESEARCH    WEBINARS

When City Security Goes Too Far

Newest First    Oldest First    Threaded View
Page 1 / 5   >   >>
Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/11/2013 1:58:22 PM
User Rank Staff
Re:
Flanagan, thanks for a thoughtful reply. I understand why this is near and dear to your heart. What a blessing that your father made it out OK. You raise some good points here about why it is that the local residents care. Perhaps you're right about them being concerned about increased traffic around the site. I've also read remarks that said the old WTC felt disconnected from the surrounding environment and that now the new one will be, too. That latter bit I can sympathize with. But if the concern is about auto traffic, then I don't care... I'm glad to see any measure that will discourage people from getting into cars.

Flanagan55
Flanagan55  
12/11/2013 1:48:07 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re:
I guess you've highlighted that I too am torn on this subject. I believe, from a pedestrian-planning viewpoint, access to the site is important. From a PA perspective, protecting multi-billion dollar regional assets and protecting the hundreds of thousands of PATH train users daily is of utmost importance. I agree that no, a bollard will not prevent someone with a backpack bomb....but what will? The thought of the site being a policed-military zone with 24/7 survaillance and millions of dollars paid in security is depressing undoubtably. In the inverse however, what should they do? Not put in place high secure measures? As far as I'm concerend, an extremly high target site requires extremly high security measures in place. 

I must say it hurts to live in a world where this is the case, but it is the case. Vehicles, rightfully so, should be nowhere near the site. People, however, are what makes the space the space. Without anyone, it will be a 16 acre space with massive buildings and large fountains with no purpose. 

Contradicting myself repeatadly aside, the high-level security threat, 24/7, 365, requires the need for extreme security efforts. Pedestrians should have access to the fountains and memorial park with ease but beyond that, I don't mind intense security features built into the design to deterrent any attempt at taking life. In no way, shape or form should the design overlook security.

Lastly, I guess I have a hard time seeing how this effects local residents. Yes, the closing of streets to automobiles spills traffic to adjacent local streets, but quite frankly, I don't care because I am anti-automobile predominately. I assume most of the people living downtown in their high rise, luxury apartments don't want to be bothered with sitting in traffic longer? What other reasonable issue do residents have with the security plan? I doubt residents frequent the tourist-crazed space with regularity. I guess my take stems from the reality that my father was there on 9/11 and thankfully survived, but something that I don't want any other person to have to experience. The site is just too high-profile not to have some of the most intense security measures in place...it's the world we live in. 

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/11/2013 1:24:52 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Police Patrols
"It's unnerving that one 2.50 swipe of a metrocard gains someone so much access to critical infrastructure."

It sure is, especially when you put it that way!

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
12/11/2013 1:23:30 PM
User Rank Staff
Re:
I'm glad you weighed in here, Flanagan, thank you for your thoughts. I'll admit to being pretty torn on this subject. I'm 100% not opposed to the idea of making it difficult for cars to access the site... I wouldn't care if cars were banned from the city completely, so that's not an issue for me. But I do think that we can't prevent everything... no bollard is going to stop someone strapped with a bomb from doing great harm.

So, let me ask you something... you said, "I believe that the space should be open to the public and inter-connected with the surrounding built environ instead of being placed on a pedestal, unreachable by anyone." Do you feel that this is the case, that it's still accessible and connected? Or are you making an exception here, given what a target this site is?

Flanagan55
Flanagan55  
12/11/2013 12:44:16 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Police Patrols
I think about that everyday as I ride the N/Q and 4,5,6 trains. The Subway seems to incredibly vunerable to attack, yet nothing ever seems to happen. I've often wondered what security measures are in place that I apparently don't see. I've even thought about how the different turnstiles - the one that is only above 4 feet tall that you can hop over, or the more secure caged circule turnstiles - play a role in security. It's unerving that one 2.50 swipe of a metrocard gains someone so much access to critical infrastructure. I guess New Yorkers are just too busy to take notice enough, and I guess in part that people just become accustomed to things. I still try to always be aware on the subway, where possible. 

Flanagan55
Flanagan55  
12/11/2013 12:24:13 PM
User Rank Village Voice

As a PA employee and someone who has knowledge of the 16 acre WTC site in question, I don't believe that there is too much security being put in place. Soon, the barrier fence around the memorial will be taken down allowing pedestrian access into the plaza. As a planner, I believe that the space should be open to the public and inter-connected with the surrounding built environ instead of being placed on a pedestal, unreachable by anyone. 

That said, you must take into account the significance. Over 3,000 people lost their lives at this location. It's a location that was attacked twice. It is a place that, especially after the events of 9/11, will continually be the target of future attacks in how high-profile the space now is. It is home to the Western Hemisphere's tallest building and soon to be home to three other highrise towers. 

Security is incredibly important at the WTC, whether surrounding residents like it or not. Being inconvienced to walk your bike through the space, or for vehicles to go thourgh rigorous checkpoints provides little to me in the basis of complaint. I'd prefer to walk my bike if that will prevent an incident from happening.

The reality is the space is huge, in terms of a city point of view, extremely connected to mass-transit and will forever be a high-level target around the world. With the events at the Boston Marathon, I have aboslutely NO problem with security measures in place. We learn from mistakes as human beings. After 9/11, rigorous security procedures at airports were put in place, and since, a plane has not been hijacked. The PAPD and NYPD learned from the shortcomings in 1993 and 2001 and have since made efforts to subdue any potential for disaster. This is the unfortunate world we live in, and in a place as high-level as the WTC, these security measures are essential to be in place.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
11/26/2013 4:23:21 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Police Patrols
Ha! I think that's really funny about Homeland Theatre, @piratejulie. You just have to ask yourself what it's all for as you labor your way through the airport lineup. And the snafus that have gone on are more than outrageous.

I've heard that airports may be reducing some of the precautions. Anybody else heard that?

piratejulie
piratejulie  
11/26/2013 3:30:11 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Police Patrols
@ Mary : I very much appreciate the sentiment [and its expression] here :  "I think [we have to] be cautious about overreach, about the appearance of security without real security."  That said, I am reminded of a discussion I had recently about airport "security."  My conversation partner quipped : "Oh, you mean Homeland Theatre!"

piratejulie
piratejulie  
11/26/2013 3:22:01 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Police Patrols
Yes, moomin-mashka. There are many vulnerabilities in New York City [and elsewhere]. I have no idea what the likelihood of another attack at the World Trade Center [Freedom Tower] will be but 9 /11 was not the first attack there.  

mejiac
mejiac  
11/25/2013 3:47:30 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Police Patrols
@Nicole,

I'll illustrate with a recent article at huufingtonpost.

 

So instead of relying on more spendign regarding infrastructure, have meassures in place to assure safer ways to react.

I'll relate to my experience when I was working as an Intern in Manufacturing. For that company, safety was everything, and they were very proud of getting certified by OSHA by having so many hours accident free. Key was providing a mindset of safety first, but also training everyone well enough to react when the slightest unsafe situation might occure.

So if we had systems in place that can trigger an alert if a possible situation were to occur, we might be able to contain it before it gets worse

 

Page 1 / 5   >   >>
today's cartoon
 | 
contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click here
Wait till you see the one they put next to the tracks…
Cartoon Archive
research
Smart City Money Makers
companies and solutions that are most prominent, and destined to be most profitable, in the smart city revolution.
How to Make Your City Smarter
Cities all over the world need to become smarter and more sustainable. But where to start? Download this guide to learn the first, proven steps toward making your city smarter.
all research
quick poll
Join the discussion
All polls
twitter feed
Future Cities Twitter Feed
follow us on facebook
Site Moderators
Future Cities is looking for engaged readers to moderate the message boards on this site. Engage in high-IQ conversations; earn kudos and perks. Interested? E-mail:
moderators@ubmfuturecities.com
directory
Designed to provide the people with access to green building products all year round
connect to us
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2014 UBM,
All rights reserved.