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NYC: 7 Things at Risk, Post-Bloomberg

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hfreeman17
hfreeman17  
12/10/2013 5:44:52 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
3 years, 11 months
....Until the next election.

I'm late to the comments section of this post--which is excellent, by the way--but in NewDream's efficient fashion, let me outline my agreements and disagreements with what is at risk:
  1. Horse-drawn carriages: I'm against them; I skateboard alongside those poor horses and they look drearier and drearier.  To want more of them rather than less of them means returning to the days of typhoid fever and mass mistreatment of the animals, who were often left dead in the street.  Let this quaint tradition go.
  2. Stop-and-frisk: Agree 100% with NewDream. Has to go.  I had lunch today with a white male friend who thought stop and frisk made us safer.  I debated with him; if I am a man of color, I am a target. (I'm white.)
  3. Inspection results: Like them.  Would prefer a more snappy color palette of the letters, however.  Fuscia and chartreuse and so forth.
  4. Times Square Pedestrian Plaze: to release Sadik-Khan is like the Red Sox letting Babe Ruth go to the Yankees.  Whoever gets her next is one lucky city.  Let's all move there.
  5. Church and state: This is a sticky one.  As a Christian, I felt the city has had a double standard toward Christians (as opposed to toward Muslims, for instance), and the actions of the Department of Education in banning church groups from meeting in public schools was capricious and largely unjustified by local communities.  We have had all three of our boys in public schools and I have served as co-president of the PTA.  If you're a basically decent human being--Christian, Jewish, Muslim--there's no reason why a religious group can't meet and pay rent (which most groups did, by the way) at a time during unused capacity, helping a local principal's budget. I'm spilling a lot of ink on this, because NYC has benefited over the years from religion and the charitable giving by religiously motivated people (Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant in particular).  Not to recognize that as part of a healthy urban ecosystem is to ignore a critical part of sustainability.  OK.
  6. Charter schools:  In favor of them in principle but, again as a public school parent, they are crammed down a community's throat too often.  Community input is gathered by the DOE, but it is not heeded or incorporated often into the final decision.
  7. Tax breaks for developers: Since 1811 and the grid, Manhattan has been about maximizing the value of each square foot, and this is NYC's economic engine.  It's not about to change.  That said, and this is a tangential but germane point, housing policy (which de Blasio has experience in) will be critical.  To lose affordable housing in Manhattan and the other 4 boroughs will displace the "dreamer" group that E.B. White wrote about eloquently in 1949 or prevent them from moving here.  Then NYC will really be an unpleasant place to live.

I'm not sanguine about de Blasio's future.  He's never really run anything as an executive.  I hope he's wise enough to take advice from good counselors.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
11/14/2013 9:21:08 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: The outcome
Legally, he could run again in the future. But I don't think he would. He's already 71.

moomin-mashka
moomin-mashka  
11/13/2013 8:14:27 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: The outcome
@ Nicole

 Can Bloomberg be elected after a break for the next 4 years? 

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
11/12/2013 4:30:31 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Excellent roundup
I'm with you all the way here, Amy. And I think the "us vs them" mentality is holding us back in many, many ways (rural vs urban; bikes vs cars... etc.).

Of course, the extreme "motorists" aren't only resentful toward bikes... it's anything non-car that gets them going. I was just at a conference in Boston this morning talking with a woman who works for the government in Cleveland, and she was expressing her jealousy to me that I would soon be hopping an Amtrak back to NYC (have hopped, currently riding). She reminded me that the federal government had granted Ohio money a few years ago to spend on building high-speed rail... and then when a republican governor took over there, he sent the money right back.

Depressing times, these are!

Amy Rogers Nazarov
Amy Rogers Nazarov  
11/12/2013 4:23:51 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Excellent roundup
Oh cry me a RIVER! Not YOU, Nicole - the put-upon Motorist crowd!

Since the Eisenhower Administration this country has been geared toward the car-driving masses! Yup, I've got one, too, and perhaps my argument would be stronger if I was like my neighbor Mike, who has never owned a car. But still, why must pro-bike be anti-car?

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
11/11/2013 9:46:34 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: The outcome
You are correct, Hazel. Bloomberg served the max number of terms that he was legally allowed to... plus an additional one! See my reply to moomin-mashka.

One thing, it looks like Bloomberg and de Blasio are already collaborating, and that Bloomberg is throwing his support behind him. I find that comforting and I hope it continues.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
11/11/2013 9:43:22 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: The outcome
Hi moomin-mashka: Here in New York City, we have term limits that restrict mayors to serving two terms, or eight years. Mayor Bloomberg ended up serving three terms because, as his time was winding down, he had the city council temporarily overturn the ban on his ability to run for a third term. This was a controversial move, and at the time Bloomberg justified it by saying that, with the city trying to pull itself out of a recession, it would be a bad time for him to leave office.

I, for one, am grateful that Bloomberg stayed for a third term, as I think some of his best work was accomplished during these past four years. But, seeing as we do have a limit on terms here, I don't think he realistically could've stuck around for a fourth. Some people were very upset that he changed the law, seeing it sort of as an abuse of money/power. Maybe it was -- but I do think it benefited the city to have Mayor Bloomberg around for an additional four years.

Hazel
Hazel  
11/10/2013 9:49:41 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: The outcome
I don't think he quit. I believe he served maximum term, and it was time to make way for another man. I do think he did a stellar job.

Hazel
Hazel  
11/10/2013 9:49:02 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Excellent roundup
Like Amy, I'm also interested in how the new mayor will move forward. Bloomberg achieved a lot of things during his term, and it would be a shame if some of them were undone for lack of continuity or given opposing views.

moomin-mashka
moomin-mashka  
11/8/2013 6:20:59 PM
User Rank City Slicker
Re: The outcome
Nicole, why did mayor Bloomberg have to quit hi job? Are there some regulations, like 4-8- 12 years limit?

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