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How America's First Eco-City Died

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mejiac
mejiac  
7/30/2013 1:08:55 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: A sad story
@Davedgreat2000,

 

I do agree that education system is falling behind. What I do see is that it falls a lot on parents to make sure kids are getting the guidance and resources they need.

More and more, supplemental education is becoming more important (at least from what I'm seeing with my kids, since schools only go up to a point).

What amazes me is who different the US education system is from other countries. For many, school work is mandatory (you don't get to choose) and most of the coursework is geared toward science.

So we have the resources, I guess we're missing better methodologie and execution.

mejiac
mejiac  
7/30/2013 12:58:07 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: A sad story
@Davedgreat2000,

" the most important thing to start off with would actually be Leadership, you need the right sort of leaders to get the job done."

 

Cannot agree more. If there is someone that knows which buttons to push and whom to talk to, things happen, and in a good way.

There are a million and one factors to consider when presenting this type of proposal, reason why you need the correct team members to make it happen.

 

mejiac
mejiac  
7/30/2013 12:55:57 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: New Anything..A Big Gamble
"Let the true story behind Destiny serve as a warning that empty buzzwords, and empty promises, are not the things future cities are made of."

I think this says it all. You can't present something nice and shinny withouth some bone and meat into it.

Gathering the analytics to support a proposal is time consuming (and costly) but the resources are there. So it goes to show what happens when you don't show the full spectrum of what you're trying to present.

lwatcdr
lwatcdr  
7/17/2013 5:57:22 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: New Anything..A Big Gamble
Yes anyone in Florida knows about GDC. Funything is that at least two of there disasters are actually doing somewhat well. PalmBay Florida has become an actual town and Port St. Lucie Florida while stuggleing has a few hundred thousand people living their now. Of course GDC is a textbook example of now not to do a planned community. PSL lacks large tracts for schools and commercial development. AKA it was all carved into lots. Commercial development is where you can put it so you have to drive everywhere. Their is a bus service but I do not know anyone that uses it.

 

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
7/17/2013 4:06:58 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: greenfield development is the wrong direction
Thanks for the great feedback and reality check, Kate. And what an important point, too, about eliminating greenfield development. I must say, I've read quite a bit from people who allegedly promote "sustainable" development in which they name greenfields as great places to build. Do you find, in your field, that this is a big subject for debate?

(I tend to place greenfield development on the same list in my mind as desalination: Both processes, to me, are great examples of human beings not learning their lesson and continuing to assume that all of the planet is theirs for the taking, consequence-free.)

Kate
Kate  
7/17/2013 2:12:41 PM
User Rank Blogger
greenfield development is the wrong direction
It should always be a red flag when an "eco-city" is proposed for "vast, beautiful land" and a "major pristine piece of old Florida" – as described by Anthony V. Pugliese, III in the promotional video.  This is oxymoronic.  Greenfield development, no matter how many green bells and whistles, is exactly what we should be eliminating. New cities should occur on already developed areas as per best practices and standards like LEED for Neighborhood Development.  It is also suspect when a proposed "eco-city" shows no strategies or even awareness of the existing natural biophysical patterns and habitat.  Good going Florida officials, for seeing through the hype.   

Davedgreat2000
Davedgreat2000  
7/17/2013 11:59:29 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: A sad story
Thank you for the links. i'll have to check them out soon.

The first step is to create common goals, that every can agree too...like money, housing, energy.

Second would probably be location, followed by funding. but i think the most important thing to start off with would actually be Leadership, you need the right sort of leaders to get the job done.

wbalthrop
wbalthrop  
7/17/2013 10:55:41 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: A sad story
 

For information about the Technoprogressives, check out http://www.ieet.org/

Technocracy was founded back in the 1930's, got very popular and then fizzled out, but remain to this day as a fringe group. They have a web site at http://www.technocracy.org/

The most well thought out plans come out of the Venus Project, but they are very idealistic in their thinking; http://www.thevenusproject.com/

The Zeitgeist Movement actually began as the activist arm of the Venus Project, but the two groups could not agree on how to present the message, and so went their separate ways. Both groups still advocate a Resource Based Economy. They would not only eliminate the use of currency, they would eliminate all forms of money and trade, opting instead for technology and automation to make all resources abundant and available to everyone free (since there is no use of money or trade). Like air, resources would be owned by no individual, they would come under common ownership of all humanity. Soon technology and automation will be able to provide an abundace of all meterial needs, the can even automate the distribution equitably. Life would be like living at an all inclusive resort. As I've mentioned in another post, the problem I have with this plan is how to get there from here.

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
7/17/2013 10:48:21 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: New Anything..A Big Gamble
@kq4ym: Absolutely true about new "anything" being a gamble. And thanks for the example from Hendry County. Very disappointing and, unfortunately, I think more the norm than the exception when it comes to new developments.

With that in mind, I think it would be useful for us to discuss what needs to be considered when it comes to deciding whether or not to develop a new city. Thoughts?

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
7/17/2013 10:42:35 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Eco-City
@lwatcdr: Thanks for the great feedback. It's good to hear from someone who is familiar with the area and can speak to the fact that there was no real hope for this project from the beginning. Your point about cities needing to fill a need for people is spot on. People are not just going to move to an area because it's considered an eco-city. The "if you build it, they will come" mentality is simply wrong and is the cause of a great deal of wasted development. You're right: there must be jobs, there must be talent, there must be adequate transportation. From the memos I received from the state, it seems that this site was destined for sprawl.

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