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Let Them Drink Toilet Water!

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Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
2/7/2013 7:48:30 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Use for industrial purposes
re: "One intereresting fact, the Metro Water Authority  raised our water rates a few years ago to start water conservation.  Than they raised our water rates again because we did not use enough water to warrant water import."

Huh, now that is hard to swallow! Sounds like poor governance at the water authority. I can't imagine this was well-received by citizens there?

Thank you for all of the links. I'm currently in flight and have veeerrryyy slooooowww Internet access, so I will read them later!

Steven Boxall
Steven Boxall  
2/7/2013 1:00:22 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Drinking Water
@ Susan Leach

 

I am dissapointed that this therefore appears to be a myth.

Susan Leach
Susan Leach  
2/7/2013 10:17:01 AM
User Rank Blogger
Re: Drinking Water
@ Steven Boxall

As a former Londoner, I remember people saying something similar. 

But after reading Nicole's article I thought I'd check to see how London's water was looking these days and was really surprised. This is where Thames Water says the city's water comes from (2.6 billion litres to 9 million people every day):

"Thirty-five per cent of the water we supply is pumped from natural underground reservoirs called aquifers. The other 65 per cent is pumped from rivers. However, the vast majority of river water is supplied from aquifers, making groundwater our most important source of water."

I really thought more of it would be treated water. Treated by nature instead, I guess.

James@SanDiego
James@SanDiego  
2/6/2013 11:48:09 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Economics behind Desalination of water
Dear Nicole, one last tidbit on the desalination water delimnia, one of our TV News Broadcasters did a bit of journalisim on this:

http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/economy/article_40cda1d8-40d0-11e2-af4f-001a4bcf887a.html

James@SanDiego
James@SanDiego  
2/6/2013 11:38:25 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Use for industrial purposes
Hi again Nicole,

Here is another informative link regarding the Metro Water Authority:

http://www.mwdh2o.com/mwdh2o/pages/legal/litigation/index.html

Water has become big business out here and we are on the edge of the worlds biggest ocean & weather maker with enough water to go around if processed correctly.  But again only in America, where we tackle the worlds problems yet are unable to tackle the problems in our own back yard!

James@SanDiego
James@SanDiego  
2/6/2013 11:24:09 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Use for industrial purposes
Hi Nicole,

Interesting question.  I believe that most citizens would prefer the desal'd water as opposed to recycled toilet water.  Being that San Diego is on the coast, the cost for water transport would be a minimal add on and certainly less expensive than importing water for us.  One intereresting fact, the Metro Water Authority  raised our water rates a few years ago to start water conservation.  Than they raised our water rates again because we did not use enough water to warrant water import.  Huh?  You just can't win with un-claified authority in power.

Even if the water was readily available our storage is minimal at best.  We simply do not have the resivors that are needed to store enough water for a thristy growing city, and to make matters worse our sweage is treated and dumped into the Pacific Ocean by way of an out all 4.5 miles off shore.  Check out these links:

http://www.sandiego.gov/mwwd/facilities/ptloma/ptoutfall.shtml

http://www.sandiego.gov/mwwd/facilities/ptloma/index.shtml

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
2/6/2013 8:51:07 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Use for industrial purposes
James@SanDiego: It's terrifying, actually, to see so much damage done in such a short period. Seeing as you're in SD, what's your take on the desal vs. wastewater treatment debate? 

Nicole Ferraro
Nicole Ferraro  
2/6/2013 8:49:50 PM
User Rank Staff
Re: Economics behind Desalination of water
Venks, you're highlighting that desalination is costly and requires a lot of energy, which are two big strikes against it. What bothers me more, though, is that we're taking water from the ocean, which suggests we've learned no lessons about the impact we have on the earth by using its natural resources to serve ourselves.

While transporting fresh water may seem like an alternative, it also exacerbates the problem, which is that water resources are running low, and will run low in the areas of the world where they still seem abundant, especially if we start transporting that water to other locations.

Venks
Venks  
2/5/2013 1:39:53 AM
User Rank Urban Legend
Economics behind Desalination of water
Factors that determine the costs for desalination include capacity and type of facility, location, feed water, labor, energy, financing, and concentrate disposal. Nuclear powered desalination might be economical on a large scale.


While noting costs are falling, and generally positive about the technology for affluent areas in proximity to oceans, a 2004 study argued, "Desalinated water may be a solution for some water-stress regions, but not for places that are poor, deep in the interior of a continent, or at high elevation. Unfortunately, that includes some of the places with biggest water problems.", and, "Indeed, one needs to lift the water by 2,000 metres (6,600 ft), or transport it over more than 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) to get transport costs equal to the desalination costs. Thus, it may be more economical to transport fresh water from somewhere else than to desalinate it. In places far from the sea, like New Delhi, or in high places, like Mexico city, high transport costs would add to the high desalination costs. 

PureWaterSD
PureWaterSD  
2/4/2013 4:10:09 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Come Learn More
Thanks, Nicole! We appreciate you covering this important topic and hope to keep the conversation alive.

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