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What If Mayors Ruled the World?

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mejiac
mejiac  
10/29/2013 9:34:24 AM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Practical v. abstract
@Venks,

Thank you very much for your comment.

"how good are the relations of the local government with the national government." This is very interesting.

I lived for most my life in a country where this is a daily debate, and reason why that country is in constant struggle with itself.

So I do agree that is there's a healthy relationship, things do move forward.

To the community: Can anyone mention a specific example where it was the relationship between a local government and the national government that assisted in solving an issue?

 

Thanks

Venks
Venks  
10/28/2013 10:58:00 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Practical v. abstract
@majjac: Thats exactly what my thoughts were like. First try to find the solution for the problem you see. At this point, I would like to remember one of the proverbs we learnt during our childhood days, 'A stitch in time saves nine'. Attack the problem as soon as you see it. 

City problems are relatively smaller and hence can be solved quickly. Its only a matter of how good the local government is and how good are the relations of the local government with the national government. That will ensure the smooth operations at the city level.

mejiac
mejiac  
10/28/2013 1:30:39 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Practical v. abstract
@richheap, thank you for your comment,

 

Like you mention, if we "do smaller things to improve these situations bit by bit", we can definitly get some traction, and slowly start actually addressing problems.

If we can simply manage to build solutions for small problems, and slowly work on the next slightly bigger problem, we'll get somewhere.

It's like math, there's no way you can determine the solution by looking at the entire equation, you need to start from one end in order to get to the other end.

Mary Jander
Mary Jander  
10/25/2013 9:38:12 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Practical v. abstract
The old adage, "Rome wasn't built in a day" seems oddly appropriate here. In our world of instant everything, we forget the value of chipping away at things and working toward a goal -- or, to put it another way, the value of process over instant gratification.

richheap
richheap  
10/25/2013 4:13:50 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Practical v. abstract
You're right, mejiac. There isn't a "golden solution" for a lot of the issues we're talking about here, and spending time discussing the perfect cause of action can get in the way of actually making things happen. Even if cities can't fix a lot of these issues first time, then can at least do smaller things to improve these situations bit by bit. That would link in with the pragmatism that Benjamin Barber is talking about.

richheap
richheap  
10/25/2013 4:11:09 AM
User Rank Staff
Re: Thinking Reverse
Thanks Venks, I just revisited your comment but, to be honest, I couldn't think of much else to add.

You're right that there isn't a huge amount national governments can do to force city leaders to address the global challenges mentioned by Barber. They can threaten to remove funding if certain targets aren't met (and then actually do it), but that strategy only works so far because if cities aren't given as much money then it can make it harder to solve their problems. Then they fail again, their funding gets cut further, and so on.

mejiac
mejiac  
10/24/2013 3:31:52 PM
User Rank Village Voice
Re: Practical v. abstract
@Mary Jander,

Thank you your reply. It goes in tune with my own thoughts.

As mentioned in the article, I love the idea of having a "parliament of mayors" setup to address specific concern.

Like you mention Mary, the hire up the totem pole, the more out of touch we become, but if there's a specific group aimed to focus on a specific task...we literrally can make a better world one task at a time, versus trying to come up with the golden solution to solve all issues (which simply isn't real).

DigitalDruid
DigitalDruid  
10/20/2013 5:00:13 PM
User Rank Village Voice
A new parliament is not needed...
To be frank, I think we have plenty of organizations talkng about our Anthropocene Era challenges.  One more coalition is probably not necessary.

What is necessary is more strategic, cohesive action, which will be a challenge in and of itself. Also needed is a better management framework to guide our decision- and policy-making.

Being pragmatic assumes some sort of trade-off between strategic and tactical concerns, as well as showing a bias for action as opposed to debate.  I'm all for pragmatism...but how to establish a framework in which to be pragmatic in both tactical and strategic actions?  How to blend the two in a comprehensive going-forward plan of action?

The answer is Enterprise Architecture.  In "Enterprise Architecture as Strategy", MIT business professors show that organizations that adopt EA are more significantly more successful than those that don't.

We do not have a "Whole of Government" EA in America for the local, state and federal levels.  To be fair, we have some scattered efforts at all levels, but nothing common or cohesive. So we have no frameworks with which to make informed decisions.  We "thrash about", as E. O. Wilson says.

Canada has EA at all levels of government.  Denmark used EA to reorganize its local government into more effective and efficient regions.  Singapore uses EA to design better service delivery. Yet we in America persist in our ignorance.  Is it any coincidence these nations score far higher than the USA on various "happiness" indices?

It is past the time for us to rely on organic administration and begin to design and architect better governance in America.

My Smarter Local Government and Cognitive Digital Democracy concept embrace EA and promote citizen engagement in regional community clouds.

Until we design better government for the 21st century, without abandoning our principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Federalist Papers, we will continue to thrash about and decline relative to the rest of the world. We have to interpret those principles in a more modern context.  The world has changed significantly since they were expressed.

A quote from one of the reviewers of the book on Amazon.com:

"I do not recall reading another business book in recent years which I found more intellectually stimulating...and practical. Where to begin? Perhaps the most appropriate approach would be to quote the authors. In their Preface, Ross, Weill, and Robertson suggest that, until now, research and executive education have failed to make a breakthrough in understanding and improving IT architecture efforts. They then recall Albert Einstein's observation, "The significant problems we face cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them." What do the authors recommend? "The focus needs to be higher - on enterprise architecture, the organizing logic for core business processes and IT infrastructure reflecting the standardization and integration of a[n organization's] operating model.

See my blog post "America...we have a problem" at thedigitaldruid.org.  More to come on this when I get some time...

piratejulie
piratejulie  
10/17/2013 3:15:24 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Mayor Koch
"I'm the sort of person who will never get ulcers. Why? Because I say exactly what I think. I'm the sort of person who might give other people ulcers." 

I offer this quote to support my view that Mayor Koch would pass on 'ruling' the world.

piratejulie
piratejulie  
10/17/2013 3:06:05 PM
User Rank Urban Legend
Re: Mayor Koch
Some cities have had some "bad apples" but where Mayor Koch is concerned, his city [New York] was the Big Apple!

I note this to illustrate his perspective; his orientation; as a politician and as a very off the cuff leader.

 

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